Walt Disney Co, The DIS Fundamental Data | Intrinio

Walt Disney Co, The

Company

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Overview

The Walt Disney Company, together with its subsidiaries, operates as an entertainment company worldwide. The company's Media Networks segment operates cable programming services, including the ESPN, Disney channels, and Freeform networks; broadcast businesses, which include the ABC TV Network and eight owned television stations; radio businesses consisting of the ESPN Radio Network; and the Radio Disney network. It also produces and sells original live-action and animated television programming to first-run syndication and other television markets, as well as subscription video on demand services and in home entertainment formats, such as DVD, Blu-Ray, and iTunes. Its Parks and Resorts segment owns and operates the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida and the Disneyland Resort in California. This segment also operates Disney Resort & Spa in Hawaii, Disney Vacation Club, Disney Cruise Line, and Adventures by Disney; and manages Disneyland Paris, Hong Kong Disneyland Resort, and Shanghai Disney Resort, as well as licenses its intellectual property to a third party for the operations of the Tokyo Disney Resort in Japan. The company's Studio Entertainment segment produces and acquires live-action and animated motion pictures for distribution in the theatrical, home entertainment, and television markets primarily under the Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and Touchstone banners. This segment also produces stage plays and musical recordings; licenses and produces live entertainment events; and provides visual and audio effects, and other post-production services. Its Consumer Products & Interactive Media segment licenses its trade names, characters, and visual and literary properties; develops and publishes games for mobile platforms; and sells its products through The Disney Store, DisneyStore.com, and MarvelStore.com, as well as directly to retailers. The company was founded in 1923 and is based in Burbank, California.

Identification

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Ticker
DIS
CIK0001744489
SIC4841
SectorServices
Industry CategoryMedia
Industry GroupEntertainment - Diversified

Contact

Address500 SOUTH BUENA VISTA ST, BURBANK, CA 91521
Website www.thewaltdisneycompany.com
Phone8185601000
CEORobert A. Iger
Employees201,000

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Standardized Financials

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Intrinio provides professional-grade historical financial data. This data is standardized, cleansed and verified to ensure the highest quality data sourced directly from the XBRL financial statements. The primary purpose of standardized financials are to facilitate comparability across a single company’s fundamentals and across all companies fundamentals.

For example, it is possible to compare total revenues between two companies as of a certain point in time, or within a single company across multiple time periods. This is not possible using the as reported financial statements because of the inherent complexity of reporting standards.

Below is a preview of several data points from each financial statement, as well as a sample of our many calculated metrics:

Income Statement
Revenue$64.78 billion
Pre-Tax Income$15.89 billion
Net Income$12.80 billion
Net Income to Common$12.32 billion
EPS$7.93
View All
Balance Sheet
Cash$6.73 billion
Assets$209.48 billion
Liabilities$104.22 billion
Common Equity$90.47 billion
Liabilities & Equity$209.48 billion
View All
Cash Flow Statement
Net Income$12.80 billion
Cash From Operating Activities$8.44 billion
Cash From Investing Activities$-13.98 billion
Cash From Financing Activities$8.49 billion
Change in Cash$2.93 billion
View All
Calculations
NOPAT$9.21 billion
EBITDA$20.78 billion
Price to Earnings$20.14
Price to Book$2.74
ROE16.36%
View All

Latest News

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Intrinio provides up-to-date news articles on every US company from various sources. Here are several examples:

How Virtual Streamers Became Japan’s Biggest YouTube Attraction

(Bloomberg) -- Kizuna Ai, the most popular streamer in Japan, is an anatomically exaggerated, perpetually adolescent girl in frilly thigh-high socks and a pink hair ribbon. She’s also an entirely virtual character, given life by the actions and voice of an invisible actress.In the home of anime and “Ghost in the Shell” futurism, millions now follow Kizuna Ai online, and that success has spawned thousands of copycat acts and a cottage industry catering to so-called virtual YouTubers, or VTubers. Defying the Western streamer blueprint of young male gamers like PewDiePie and Ninja, Japan has invented a new class of streaming star that’s equal parts digital avatar and interactive anime.“What separates VTubers from regular anime characters is that you can believe they actually exist,” said Takeshi Osaka, founder of Activ8 Inc., the Tokyo-based company behind Kizuna Ai. “That presence is an important part of what makes them so appealing.”Sidestepping the labor-intensive and time-consuming process of traditional animation -- ill-suited to the fast-paced world of YouTube content -- Activ8 uses Hollywood-grade motion capture equipment to crank out music videos, skits and game streams just about every day for more than 4 million subscribers.The technology allows Kizuna to interact with fans in real time at exhibitions, give interviews on live TV and perform in concerts. It’s a virtual influencer that can patronize real-world events.While Activ8 doesn’t disclose technical details, its product is an almost seamless combination of lifelike movements, gestures and facial expressions, all of which contribute to the suspension of disbelief.“The innovation here is in how they combine real-time 3D computer graphics, motion capture and video streaming sites like YouTube to create two-way interactions with audiences,” said Eiji Araki, a senior vice president at Gree Inc. who heads a division specializing in VTubers.Kizuna Ai debuted on YouTube in December 2016 and was responsible for coining the term “VTuber.” The technology that opened the door for its many imitators arrived that same year, in the form of the first commercial virtual reality goggles. Designed to do precise head and hand tracking, the VR kits from Facebook Inc.’s Oculus and HTC Corp.’s Vive turned out to be perfect animation rigs for VTuber aspirants on a budget. With free-to-use animation engines and 3-D models from the likes of Unity Technologies, anyone could create a virtual puppet studio for cheap in their living room.Virtual Beings Get Real With First Emmy From HollywoodIt’s no accident that VTubers found fertile ground in Japan. The country has a long history of user-generated content centered on anime, and performances by virtual idols like Hatsune Miku have drawn real-world crowds for more than a decade. While international audiences may prefer more photorealistic characters -- which are more difficult to create and animate -- their Japanese counterparts raised on comic book heroes have no problem with cartoonish looks.The VTuber phenomenon has so far been almost exclusively Japanese, however its underlying technology and formula of combining popular culture with increased interactivity -- and thus believability -- are universal. And Activ8 already has ambitions to expand its VTuber portfolio beyond Japan.While Japan’s global tech leadership may have faded since the days of the Walkman, its trendsetting habits remain strong in the gaming realm. Three out of four gaming consoles sold in the world today are made by Nintendo Co. and Sony Corp., while free-to-play mobile games are taking over the globe with monetization techniques pioneered by Japanese companies. And then there are globally beloved game series like Super Mario, Zelda, Monster Hunter and Pokémon. Anime, another major Japanese cultural export, is a $20 billion industry whose products range from Oscar-winning high-brow works by Hayao Miyazaki to action-packed light entertainment like “Battle Angel Alita,” which recently got a Hollywood remake. VTubers are a cross between these two Japanese pastimes.Market researcher User Local Inc. estimates there are now over 9,000 VTuber channels. The most popular ones are produced by a handful of professional studios like Activ8, each managing dozens of characters. In the space of less than three years, virtual streamers have morphed from an obscure subculture to a big business. Kizuna Ai can now be found in ads for instant cup noodles and eye drops, appearing at local carrier SoftBank Corp.’s launch event and helping the Japan National Tourism Organization’s promo campaigns.“There is no doubt that this will change the future of entertainment,” said Hironao Kunimitsu, the founder of Gumi Inc., an early investor in Activ8 and about 70 other VR startups. He cautions, however, that “for this type of content to resonate outside of Japan, it will have to be adapted to local tastes and sensibilities.”For now, Japanese VTubers are taking the path of least resistance and exporting their characters to China’s large and underserved anime market. Activ8 earlier this year introduced a Chinese version of Kizuna Ai, changing its dress and voice, and now it has close to 820,000 followers on the country’s Bilibili video-sharing service.Ultimate success for Activ8’s chief means making it into Hollywood, which is already a well-trodden path for Japanese gaming franchises like Resident Evil, Pokémon and Sonic the Hedgehog. Given the world’s appetite for Japanese culture, VTubers might not even have to dilute their product very much.“I started this virtual entertainer business because I believe it can be done worldwide,” Osaka said. “Our goal is to become the next-generation Disney.”To contact the reporters on this story: Pavel Alpeyev in Tokyo at palpeyev@bloomberg.net;Yuki Furukawa in Tokyo at yfurukawa13@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Vlad Savov, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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Netflix Buys "Seinfeld" as the Streaming Wars Heat Up.

Netflix Buys "Seinfeld" as the Streaming Wars Heat Up.

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Disney Stock May Have a Secret Weapon in the Streaming Wars

2019 is shaping up to be quite the year in the battle for America's streaming market. Almost every week there's some big piece of news. Different competitors are launching new services, price points, content, hardware, and the like quite regularly.Source: Shutterstock Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) is the latest entrant, as it has just revealed plenty of details about its Apple TV+ service which will launch later this fall. What will it mean for Disney (NYSE:DIS) stock?Apple isn't the only streaming company making news. Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) just announced its latest big move, grabbing the streaming rights for "Seinfeld," starting in 2021 from Sony (NYSE:SNE).InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsIn a highly competitive market, what is Disney doing to stay ahead of the field? Disney Ties Up With Microsoft, Breaks Up With AppleLast week, as Apple was rolling out its TV offering, one of its board members stepped down from their role. Bob Iger, Disney's CEO, was the departing member. With Apple and Disney now in direct competition, it no longer made any sense for Iger to help oversee Apple's affairs. * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip As Disney distances itself from Apple, it's moving in another direction. Variety reported that Disney and Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) have reached an agreement to work together on a cloud solution using Azure to help Disney produce movies more easily.Disney specifically picked Microsoft because it was focused on the media space. However, unlike rivals, it hasn't been accused of looking at people's data to try to refine their own content. By contrast, who knows what data Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) might harvest for use in its original content if Disney had picked Amazon Web Services. Apple's Streaming Threat to DISIt appears that the streaming wars will end up having a major impact on tech hardware producers as well. Apple's latest moves around Apple TV+ suggest as much.Apple will be giving out a free one-year trial to its Apple+ TV service. Analysts expect this to have a negative impact on Apple's earnings. Goldman Sach's analyst, Rob Hall, for example, slashed his price target from $187 to $165 on AAPL stock. Hall suggested that this trial will work, in effect, as a $60 reduction in the sales price for new Apple hardware, significantly lowering the company's average selling price for new products.Apple, for what it's worth, disputed Hall's assessment of the situation and said there would be no significant impact to the company's financials as a result of its Apple TV+ promotion. One certain impact for Apple, however, is that it is losing any friendly ties with Disney. Disney Can Partner With a Variety of Hardware MakersRegardless, Apple's move raises an interesting point for Disney stock. Amazon has long been lumping services together within Prime to try to drive more customer stickiness. Now it seems that Apple and Google (NASDAQ:GOOGL, NASDAQ:GOOG), among others, may rely more heavily on cross-subsidizing its various products and services.This gives Disney a real opportunity as it has a ton to offer hardware producers. It can deliver video, audio (it has Disney Radio and Records among other things), games, and tons of other IP. Yet Disney itself is more hardware-agnostic. This allows it to partner with various TV, phone, and other electronics markers to offer packages emphasizing native Disney content.While Microsoft is not strong in hardware outsize of video games at the moment, Disney's partnership with them shows potential. Disney can work with companies like Microsoft, Samsung, Huawei, and other giants that don't have competing content services.Meanwhile companies like Apple and Amazon that try to control both hardware and content will find themselves increasingly isolated from the rest of the world. Especially given the increasing anti-trust concerns, it seems unlikely that conditions will allow one ecosystem to dominate everything as much as, say, the iPhone did in the past. This gives Disney's streaming a leg up on the offerings from the big tech companies. Disney's Top Rival Is Still NetflixEven with all the excitement out of Apple and Amazon, among others, Disney stock owners shouldn't sleep on the company's biggest rival in streaming: Netflix. We have seen a lot of people saying that Netflix has peaked and that rivals will overtake it soon. I say critics have exaggerated the death of NFLX stock. Netflix is still spending an ever-increasing amount of money on licensing and original shows and movies -- its all-in content budget is up to $15 billion this year. On top of that, Netflix is spending almost $3 billion annually on marketing.With that sort of growth engine in place, it's fanciful to write Netflix off as a serious competitor yet. For people that were doubting Netflix's staying power, particularly with 30-and-40 something viewers after it elected to let "Friends" leave the platform, the arrival of "Seinfeld" should put these concerns to rest. Netflix still has the budget and appetite to go get blockbuster franchises.DIS stock owners need not worry too much. If there's any content player with a library that matches up favorably to Netflix, it's Disney. However, Netflix's huge overseas presence including a ton of locally-relevant content for individual foreign markets will keep Netflix as a top rival to Disney going forward.Like Disney, Netflix doesn't have internal conflicts of interest between hardware and streaming services. That said, Disney could be a better partner for other neutral tech firms than Netflix. It has a much wider array of intellectual property and tangible assets beyond just film and video. Disney Stock VerdictI have long been skeptical of how the streaming battle will play out. It seems like everyone is destined to lose money, at least in the short-run. Pricing on many of these services is very low, and operators are paying exorbitant amounts of money to bring in fresh content. Disney's entries into this space -- like Netflix -- won't be a cash cow from day one.But the eventual winner in this space will be a company willing to play the long game. Disney's combination of a huge range of assets, a strong balance sheet, and its independence from other tech firms give it a strong hand to play. In addition, its aggressive pricing shows it is willing to match Netflix with solid marketing and customer engagement efforts of its own.I don't expect streaming to power overnight success for DIS stock, but I'm warming up to the company's long-term strategy for the streaming wars.At the time of this writing, Ian Bezek held no positions in any of the aforementioned securities. You can reach him on Twitter at @irbezek. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip * 7 Dow Titans Breaking Higher * 5 Growth Stocks to Sell as Rates Move Higher The post Disney Stock May Have a Secret Weapon in the Streaming Wars appeared first on InvestorPlace.

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The Walt Disney Company Announces Pricing Information for Tender Offers by The Walt Disney Company and 21st Century Fox America, Inc.

The Walt Disney Company announced today the pricing information of the previously announced cash tender offers of Disney and its indirect subsidiary, 21st Century Fox America, Inc.

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Google Cloud Head of India Resigns, Joins Disney Unit

The head of Google’s cloud computing business in India, Nitin Bawankule, is set to leave the company at the end of this month.

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